Video Posts


Normally the main streets of Anhai look like one of those movie scenes where nuclear attack has been announced and everyone is trying to flee the city by car, motorcycle, scooter, bicycle, or ox cart.

Nuclear attack?

Wait, we’re talking about China. Make that, “Normally the main streets of Anhai look like one of those movie scenes where the approach of advancing Communist or Nationalist troops–depending on who made the movie–has been announced and everyone is trying to flee the city by car, motorcycle, scooter, bicycle, or ox cart.”

The scenes in the video below, though, were shot on Chinese New Year’s Eve, when it’s relatively calm–mostly people on foot, bicycles, motorscooters, and those Anhai ‘Mad Max’ Taxis that have since been outlawed and replaced with the Universal Studios tourmobiles.

This also helps illustrate the “ugly public areas” of Anhai, as opposed to the relative luxury the locals live in behind their gated courtyards, as described in Explaining Anhai.

And here is the video:

Here are a few views from the rooftop of my Wife’s family home in Anhai.

You can see representations of the various “stages” of housing development throughout this part of town (although the video quality isn’t that great).

We’ve caught more than a few good sunsets from up there, though, and it’s also where my Mother-in-Law keeps a flower garden, hangs the laundry to dry, and where we took the kids to play with sparklers during the Chinese New Year celebrations.

This view shows you one of the neighbor’s own rooftop gardens:

Another view looking West:

And here’s the “Bigfoot Spotted!” quality video pan from the roof:

One afternoon just before the Chinese New Year got underway, we took a walk over to the school where my Wife (and all her siblings, and her parents) attended middle school (which is essentially the same thing as junior high + high school in the U.S.).

She remembers it being “a lot smaller,” with just a couple or so buildings, but now it’s expanded and has the feel of a small campus, maybe akin to a junior college back in the States (with Chinese middle school characteristics).

Here are a few pictures and a video from the center of the sports field to give you your bearings, and note that you’ll see a temple roof across the wall in the middle of the video. That’s the temple we visited that I described in this post.

Update P.S. This is also the school field where townspeople, including my wife and her siblings, and her parents’ generation when they were schoolchildren, were “strongly encouraged” to show up to witness public executions (1950s-1980s) as civic lessons in “what happens when people break the law.”



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